Book Reviews
A couple of reviews of my recent books have appeared in the journal Cartographica over the last couple of months. 

Firstly, Kenneth Field wrote a thoughtful and generally positive review of the edited book Classics in Cartography. As he noted:

"Classics in Cartography is not only a supremely constructed book in its own right but does a fine job of representing the high calibre of papers published in Cartographica over the past 48 years. It provides an insightful read and should also be a staple for students of cartography and GIS. Given the wealth of classics that didn’t make the cut, maybe there is opportunity for a second volume? As Pink Floyd did: The Final Cut?" (Source: Cartographica, Vol. 47, No. 1)


A second review, this time for Code/Space, co-written with Rob Kitchin. Here Gwilym Eades is rather more critical of the framing of our analysis of software in his review. As he says:

"Code/space represents a valiant attempt to usher the field of software studies into being. Rob Kitchin and Martin Dodge’s co-written book succeeds in this self-proclaimed mission in many ways. My main hesitations about this book, however, revolve around limitations to the mission of software studies as a newly emerging field and not around the soundness of the methodology Kitchin and Dodge use in their comprehensive survey of the manifold effects of code on everyday lives in the modern world. While that methodology is indeed rigorous, its rigour exists within a flawed theoretical framework." (Source: Cartographica, Vol. 47, No. 2)

Other recent mentions of Code/Space include a complementary post by David Beer on his Thinking Culture blog. While our underlying concept of 'code space' also seems to be picking up traction, in part, following a LIFT Conference talk given by James Bridle entitled "We fell in love in a coded space".

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